reviews

ARTS: OK Mozart’s Grand Finale Concert

“…Opening the evening was Rossini’s Overture to “L’Italiana in Algeri,” which featured principal oboist Diane Lesser, whose playing percolating through the music like that laughing, lilting voice of the young woman of the opera’s title…”

Tulsa World
June 14, 2015

 

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Greenwich Symphony Offers a Treat

“…The evening closed with the youthful Symphony in C by Bizet. This is a symphony that features oboe solos in the first and second movements and oboist Diane Lesser played them with great skill and musical sensitivity. Gilbert took all the repeats in the work (which gives the music its proper proportion) but also gave us the chance to hear how Lesser could rethink the solos, bringing out different shades and alternative meanings.”
Greenwich Time
November 28, 2013

 

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A Concert of Quirky Gems Becomes a Memorial

“Tuesday’s concert began with the Fugal Concerto for Oboe and Flute by Holst, which shows the composer in fine Neo-Classical form. The final Allegro weaves in a jig with unexpected rhythmic accents that is based on an old English folk tune, “If All the World Were Paper.” The oboist Diane Lesser and the flutist Sato Moughalian played with poise and musicality.

William Meredith, on English horn, joined Ms. Lesser for Bach’s Duet From Cantata No. 78, in an instrumental arrangement by Mr. Simon that brought out its joyfully animated character.”

The New York Times
January 23, 2013

 

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Fantastic four: GSO soloists, in concert with entire orchestra,
help make first performance of season ‘riveting and exciting’

“First chair GSO players, Concertmaster Krystof Wytek, cellist Daniel Miller, oboist Diane Lesser, and bassoonist Mark Davies, were essentially a stand-alone chamber music ensemble backed by the Symphony in the Haydn ‘Sinfonia.’ The lovely Allegro began in violin, joined by bassoon, then moved to an interplay with the oboe, and a restatement of the main theme. A coda for the soloists slowed, then returned to the work’s upbeat tempo. Violin and bassoon opened the Andante, joined and capably backed by the orchestra in a consonant section. The lively opening of Allegro con spirito featured both the showmanship and bowmanship of Witek and Miller, who were challenged into the highest registers with rapidly ascending passages, which they tossed off with ease.”

Greenwich Citizen
Thursday, January 31, 2013

 

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An Outdoor Concert Takes Shelter in a Church

“A Haydn Sinfonia Concertante in B flat, for example, was graceful and trim, finely balanced and beautifully nuanced. It was illuminated too by fine solo playing from Eriko Sato, violinist; Lutz Rath, cellist (the festival’s music director); Diane Lesser, oboist; and Harry Searing, playing bassoon.”

The New York Times
July 14, 2010

 

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LI Philharmonic celebrates with 30th birthday concert

“…the musicians presented the so-called “Unfinished” Symphony in B Minor by Franz Schubert. The performance demonstrated beautiful phrasing, dramatic and compelling silences, and wide dynamic contrasts.  Particularly notable were principal oboe Diane Lesser’s oboe solos and Pascal Archer’s clarinet playing.”

The LI Press
November 14, 2009

 

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Gluck’s La Corona in Concert at Merkin Hall
 Danielle Munsell Howard made her New York debut as the prince Meleager[sic] and had plenty to be happy about…she sang very well and appealingly, especially in her aria with the oboist, Diane Lesser.”

The New York Times
January 27, 2005

 

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Deafness and Contempt Shape a Mass

“The evening’s curtain raiser was Haydn’s Sinfonia Concertante in B flat, featuring a quartet of string and wind soloists. It was wonderful music in the wrong place. Sound slowly rebounding from high ceilings and distant walls smothered Haydn’s elegance in a kind of rich sonic goo. It’s not that the music wasn’t heard; it was heard several times too many. Jorge Avila was the strong violinist in both pieces. Diane Lesser as oboist and Charles McCracken as bassoonist were first-rate. Arthur Fiacco played the cello part.”

The New York Times
April 23, 2005

 

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‘St. Matthew Passion’ Form a Group Worthy of Its Name

“Mitsuru Tsubota, a violinist, and Diane Lesser, an oboist, were especially impressive in solo turns.”

The New York Times

March 30, 1998

 

 

 

More Reviews

“In Diane Lesser’s flawless performance (Schumann Romances), the instrument came into its own, the artist showing its full range and tonality.”

Greenwich Citizen
November 14, 2008
 
 

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“The oboe work by Lesser was deft and virtuosic with lively runs well performed.”

Greenwich Citizen
September 30, 2005
 

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“Throughout the score, the solo work of oboist Diane Lesser was the equal of any I’ve heard in this work. (Brahms Symphony #1)”

Greenwich Time
January 21, 2005
 

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“What is there to say about the playing by principal oboist Diane Lesser except that the GSO is lucky to have her. In both the Handel and Brahms, her extended solos were wonderfully expressive—what communication through music is all about. And she does it on a notoriously cranky instrument that looks like a balustrade powered by two finicky popsicle sticks. I’ve never heard the solo in the Brahms played better.”

Greenwich Time
October 8, 2003
 

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“…Highlighted by oboist Diane Lesser’s moving performance.”

Tulsa World
June 25, 2003
 

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“In the Strauss Oboe Concerto… she is an extraordinary artist. Her delicacy of phrasing, her mastery of the oboe’s upper register, which Strauss uses relentlessly, was exemplary. Words can never express the real beauty of music. Lesser’s every inflection, her tenderness of expression, the magic of her poetic inspiration, were a continual joy. She captured every moment of caprice, every humorous sally, and all the music’s lyrical flow with beauty. The audience, and particularly the members of the orchestra, were wild with enthusiasm.”

Greenwich Time
February 9, 2000
 

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“Diane Lesser not only played the oboe with her admirable technique, control and nuance, but shared some of her thoughts with the audience in her charming, off-hand way…. Lesser played with her characteristic brilliance and agility. No technical hurdle seemed to faze her and she soared to the last movement’s high G above middle C with radiance. (The composer provided an alternate passage for cowards.) During intermission, one concertgoer found the perfect comment with the remark, ‘I just love Diane Lesser!’”

Greenwich Time
November 17, 1999
 

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“Everyone was wonderful, but one cannot resist singling out the eloquent and poignant lines of the oboe d’amore, an alto oboe, performed so beautifully by Diane Lesser, as something very special.”

Greenwich Time
March 17, 1999
 

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“The music was delightful and the oboe, that ‘Instrument of mystery with the Reed of Intrigue,’ sounded marvelous. People should receive a degree just for getting a noise out of the oboe. Diane Lesser deserves a Ph.D. for her fine solo work.”

Bartlesville OK Examiner-Enterprise
June 15, 1998
 

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“Itzhak Perlman guided the orchestra through an energetic (Bizet Symphony in C) performance. The Adagio was highlighted by a sinuous, pseudo-Arabian oboe solo by principal oboist, Diane Lesser.”

Tulsa World
June 15, 1998
 

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“The great moment of the concert, however, was the radiant oboe solo that states the slow movement’s first theme, played with eloquence of nuance and beauty of tone by Diane Lesser. It alone was worth the price of admission. For a moment one realized what music is supposed to say.”

Greenwich Time
November 23, 1994
 

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“Bach Brandenburg Concerto #1 featured a wonderful trio of Joseph Silverstein, Diane Lesser and Jonathan Spitz…. Lesser’s phenomenal oboe work in #2….”

Tulsa World
June 14, 1993
 

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“Oboist Diane Lesser’s pungent, vibrant playing stood out clearly during both works; it was the focus of the Mozart and a major factor in the Copland.”

Newsday
March 9, 1993
 

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“Copland Quiet City being graced by beautiful solo work from English hornist Diane Lesser.”

Daily News
May 11, 1989
 

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“Oboist Diane Lesser played this complex work (Vaughan Williams Concerto) exceptionally well. Her flexibility captured its ever-changing moods by weaving panoramas of beautiful sounds- full, rich, edgeless. Her subtle attacks and releases highlighted her lyrical playing which was like beautiful singing. And her technique was flawless. I felt that she really got to the heart of this work, revealing glorious vistas.”

Greenwich News
May 5, 1988
 

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“Expertly chiseled performance…”

Houston Post
November 2, 1986
 

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“The graceful phrasing of oboist Miss Lesser was truly noteworthy.”

Washington Star
 

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“The players assembled for the program were led by oboist Diane Lesser, whose caressing way with a phrase considerably enlivened the performance of Mozart’s Quintet K. 452.”

Newsday
April 20, 1982
 

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“Miss Lesser is a soloist of poise and persuasively full, sometimes exultant, sometimes poignantly wistful tone.”

Bridgeport Post
January 4, 1982
 

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“The performance of Varese Octandre cannot pass without mention of Diane Lesser, who played the oboe part. Her playing was poised and sophisticated, showing that she understood both the composer and the medium.”

Greenwich Time
November 25, 1980
 

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“Diane Lesser… provided delicious accompaniment…”

The New Yorker
April 16, 1979